Curriculum

Undergraduate Study Program Curriculum (S1)

The Undergraduate Study Program at the Department of Geography, FMIPA-UI designs a curriculum to prepare students with the knowledge and skills to make a real contribution to development. Curriculum design is inseparable from the main domains of geography which include:

  1. Spatial Perspective
  2. Human relationship with the natural environment
  3. Understanding the factors that cause differences and similarities between parts of the earth's surface.

In particular, the ultimate goal that needs to be achieved for students is to be able to provide "scientific judgment” regional facts so as to present an integrated understanding based on regional approaches to the earth's surface in relation to physical and social processes. Therefore, the learning process of geography includes:

  1. Knowledge about basic concepts and main themes of geography, including the history of its emergence and development
  2. Knowledge about physical and social systems/processes that affect the character of the earth's surface
  3. Knowledge about interrelationships between physical and social systems/processes, including its influence on human life.
  4. Knowledge about geographic techniques and methods in problem formulation, data collection, data processing, organizing information, analyzing information, and finding solutions or answers to problems.
  5. Knowledge about application of geography to understand the past, interpret the present, and plan for the future.

The education system at the Department of Geography, FMIPA-UI, as usual in universities in Indonesia, uses the Semester Credit System (SKS). To obtain a Bachelor of Science (S.Si) degree, each student must obtain a minimum of 144 credits (SKS) and a maximum of 160 credits and pass all compulsory courses at the University, Science Cluster, Faculties, and Study Programs. The lecture process is taken in 8 semesters (4 years) including field work lectures and the preparation of thesis/final assignments. The maximum length of study allowed is 12 semesters (6 years). For outstanding students, it is possible to graduate within 7 semesters (3.5 years).

The educational curriculum in the Geography Undergraduate Study Program consists of several courses which can be grouped as follows:

  1. University Compulsory Courses (18 credits), is a collection of courses organized by the University and must be followed by all students. Higher education courses are also called PDPT (College Basic Education) courses which are included in the Personality Formation (MPK) group. PDPT includes MPKT A (6 credits), MPKT B (6 credits), Religion MPK (2 credits), English MPK (3 credits), and Arts & Sports MPK (1 credits).
  2. Compulsory Science Courses (2 credits), is a collection that characterizes the scientific clump of Science and Technology that houses geography education at the University of Indonesia. The subjects included in this group are Basic Mathematics 1 which consists of 2 courses.
  3. Faculty Compulsory Courses (10 credits), is a collection of courses managed by the Faculty and must be followed by all UI Geography students. Faculty courses that present basic scientific knowledge and understanding in accordance with the characteristics of the basic sciences, consist of Basic Physics (2 credits), Basic Chemistry 1 (2 credits), Basic Linear Algebra (2 credits), Statistical Methods (2 credits), and General Biology (2 credits)
  4. Study Program Compulsory Courses (80 credits and 6 credits of thesis) is a collection of courses that characterize education and geography at the University of Indonesia. The course group consists of several basic courses that discuss the basic concepts and position of geography in the scientific world, the main elements forming the character of the earth's surface, as well as the principles of presenting spatial information. In addition, there are several courses that will provide geography knowledge and expertise at an advanced level.
  5. Elective courses is a collection of courses that prepare students for competencies according to their respective interests. To fulfill the graduation requirements, students only need to take 29 credits of elective courses from a total of 110 credits offered. Elective courses are divided into Physical Geography (42 credits), Human Geography (40 credits), and Geographic Information Systems/Remote Sensing (28 credits)

Distribution of Courses and Credit Load

University Compulsory Courses

Code : UIGE600006 (5 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to show maturity, tolerance and adaptation according to scientific, professional, and environmental ethics
  2. Able to show maturity and confidence in exploring intellectual curiosity according to the needs of society in a professional manner
  3. Able to submit critical and creative proposals about opportunities for applying the discipline of geography as a solution to life resource problems

Purpose :

Examine social issues, nation, state, and Pancasila ideology and shape student personality to become independent learners in integrative and comprehensive study, critically, logically, creatively, philosophically, innovatively based on self-understanding as individuals and community members as natural managers.

Code : UIGE600003 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to package a variety of geographic information effectively in visual, verbal, and textual forms for relevant parties
  2. Able to show maturity and confidence in exploring intellectual curiosity according to the needs of society in a professional manner
  3. Able to submit critical and creative proposals about opportunities for applying the discipline of geography as a solution to life resource problems

Purpose :

Applying the use of English effectively in an academic context in a responsible manner, both for listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

Subject :

Introduction to listening, speaking, reading, and writing techniques; grammar and paragraphing; compilation of summaries; Introduction to common etiquette and expressions in scientific discussion; selection of reading strategies; essay preparation.

Reference :

  1. G. Wiradisastra, SS Halimi, C. Poerwoto, DJ Sulichah, R. Sawitri, HM Ayu, NB Rahmanto. English For Academic Purposes MPK English University of Indonesia. 2008. Depok: Publishing Agency

Code : UIGE600004 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to show maturity, tolerance and adaptation according to scientific, professional, and environmental ethics
  2. Able to show maturity and confidence in exploring intellectual curiosity according to the needs of society in a professional manner

Purpose :

Apply their religious teachings and use them to analyze cases that occur in society.

Subject :

The history and meaning of religion, the main points of religious teachings, religion and culture, as well as an analysis of real cases that occurred in the community.

Reference :

  1. J. Ostdiek & DJ Bord, Inquiry into Physics 7th Edition, 2013. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
  2. D. Cutnell & KW Johnson, Physics 9th, 2012. John Wiley & Sons, Inc
  3. ER Huggins, Physics 2000, 2000. Moose Mountain Digital Press.

Faculty Compulsory Courses

Code: SCPH601110 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes: Able to optimize the application of the principles of natural science, mathematics, and analytical data in geographical studies

Purpose :

Explain the basic concepts of physics and their application in everyday life, including mechanics, thermodynamics, electromagnetics, waves and optics.

Subject :

Laws of motion of objects; translational and rotational motion; the law of conservation of mechanical energy; momentum; energy; static and dynamic fluids; hot; heat expansion and transport; thermodynamics; heat engine; mechanical vibration; voice; electricity; electrical capacity; electric current; magnetization; electromagnet; wave; light; optics; modern physics; atom.

Reference :

  1. J. Ostdiek & DJ Bord, Inquiry into Physics 7th Edition, 2013. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
  2. D. Cutnell & KW Johnson, Physics 9th, 2012. John Wiley & Sons, Inc
  3. ER Huggins, Physics 2000, 2000. Moose Mountain Digital Press.

Code: SCCH601101 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes: Able to optimize the application of the principles of natural science, mathematics, and analytical data in geographical studies

Purpose :

Provide a strong foundation in the concept of matter and the chemical behavior of particles to see problems in the field from a chemical point of view and can explain the role of chemistry in everyday life.

Subject :

Materials and amendments thereto; atomic components; ions and molecules; electronic structure or; stoichiometry; the main chemical reaction; the kinetic theory of gases; solutions and colligative properties; thermochemistry; field integration; integrated science.

Reference :

  1. Brown, HG Lemay, & BE Bursten. Chemistry, the Central Science. 2018. Prentice Hall, NJ
  2. S.Silberberg. Chemistry, the Molecular Nature of Matter and Change. 2012. McGraw Hill,
  3. JE Brady. General Chemistry Principles and Structure. 1990. John Wiley & Sons
  4.  

Code: SCMF600002 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes: Able to optimize the application of the principles of natural science, mathematics, and analytical data in geographical studies

Code: SCMF600001 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes: Able to optimize the application of the principles of natural science, mathematics, and analytical data in geographical studies

Purpose :

Explain the basic concepts of one-variable calculus and get used to solving calculus application problems

Subject :

real number system; inequalities and absolute values; the definition and variety of a single function variable; graph theory (Cartesian); definition and theorem of limit, continuity; transcendent, differential function; geometric meaning; differential formula; chain rule; high degree of differentiation; implicit differentiation; differential application; maximum and minimum; the postulate of the average value; definition of integral; definite and indefinite integrals; the basic theorem of calculus; integral nature; integration techniques; integral application; area and volume of the rotating object.

Reference :

  1. Varberg & ES Purcell. Calculus 9th ed. 2007. Prentice-Hall.
  2. GB Thomas & RL Finney. Calculus and Analytic Geometry 9th ed, 1996. Addison-Wesley.

Code: SCBI601112 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes: Able to optimize the application of the principles of natural science, mathematics, and analytical data in geographical studies

Purpose :

Understand and be able to solve problems related to Biology problems in general related to the environment and living things.

Subject :

Characteristics of life, cell biology, inheritance, evolution, diversity of living things, animal structure and function, plant structure and function, Indonesian biodiversity, and human interactions with other living things and the environment.

Reference :

  1. LA Urry, ML Cain, SA Wasserman, PV Minorsky, JB Reece. Campbell Biology 11th edition. 2015. Pearson Australia Group, Ltd

Code: SCMA601003 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes: Able to optimize the application of the principles of natural science, mathematics, and analytical data in geographical studies

Purpose :

Applying the basic principles of Linear Algebra in simple math problems.

Subject :

Introduction to matrices, matrix operations, determinants, matrix inverses, vectors in R2 & R3, Euclidean vector space, system of linear equations in least squares matrix using matrices, eigenvalues and eigenvectors diagonalization, linear transformation, Gaussian elimination method, LU Decomposition method.

Reference :

  1. Anton & C. Rorres. Elementary Linear Algebra, Applications Version. Eight Editions. 2000. John Wiley and Sons, Inc.: NY

Study Program Compulsory Courses

Code: SCGE601002 (2 credits) 

Learning Outcomes:

Students are able to examine the application of the basic principles of geography at various scales and characteristics of the earth's surface.

Purpose :

Applying the main principles and concepts of geography in everyday life

Subject :

The characteristics and scientific position of geography; history of emergence; the scope of the study of geography; spatial perspective; main concepts, themes and principles; geographical scientific approach (regional-systematic-ecological-historical); identification of spatial symptoms; map functions and roles; prospects for applying geography.

Reference

  1. Getis, MD Bjellend, & V. Getis. Introduction to Geography. 2017. McGraw Hill Education: NY
  2. A. Matthews, & TV Herbert. Geography, A Very Short Introduction. 2008. Oxfod University Press: New York
  3. M. Sandy, IM The Essence of Geography. 1973. Department of Geography, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Indonesia
  4. FR Spellman, FR Geography for Nongeographers. 2010. Government Institute: Lanham, Toronto, Plymouth, UK

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Code: SCGE601006 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

Able to examine the application of basic principles of geography at various scales and characteristics of the earth's surface.

Purpose :

Applying the essence of maps and mapping in the study of geography

Subject :

The essence of maps and mapping for geographical studies; cartographic scope; cartography and Geographic Information Systems (GIS); understanding and history of maps; maps and principles of spatial information; map-making theory; map projection and scale; mapping data sources; types of maps and their use in the study of geography; representation and spatial visualization of geographical phenomena; thematic maps; read and interpret maps.

Reference 

1. J Kraak & F. Ormeling. Cartography: Visualization of Geospatial Data, Fourth Edition. 2020. CRC Press

2. Cynthia. Designing Better Maps: A Guide for GIS Users. 2015. ESRI Press

3. IM Sandy. Cartography Essence. 1988. Department of Geography FMIPA UI Depok

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Code: SCGE601007 (1 credit)

Learning Outcomes:

Able to examine the application of geographical theory and method as well as spatial information technology.

Purpose :

Correctly apply map-making procedures and methods to generate geographic information

Subject :

Basic map requirements; standardization of maps and mapping; map-making procedures and techniques; use of scales, grids, and map projections; thematic map creation; data source selection; classification and categorization of data; symbol selection; map presentation; merging and overlapping maps; suitability of maps and spatial information.

Reference 

1. J Kraak & F. Ormeling. Cartography: Visualization of Geospatial Data, Fourth Edition. 2020. CRC Press

2. Cynthia. Designing Better Maps: A Guide for GIS Users. 2015. ESRI Press

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Code: SCGE601009 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

Able to examine the application of geographical theory and method as well as spatial information technology.

Purpose :

Apply survey and mapping principles and methods effectively to produce the required maps

Subject :

The role of surveying and mapping for geographic studies; field survey ethics and rules; survey scoping and planning; various sources of field data; introduction to survey types and tools (base maps, GPS, measuring instruments, etc.); the type and selection of survey methods; navigation system; field adaptation; procedures and methods for reporting survey and mapping results.

Reference 

  1. Keats. Cartographic Design and Production. 2001. John Wileys & Sons.
  2. Geographic Information System. 2001. Dept. Geography FMIPA UI
  3. A. Longley, et al. Geographic Information Science and Systems, 4th Edition. 2015. Wiley
  4. G. Charles D. & W. Paul R. Elementary Surveying: An Introduction to Geomatics. 2015. Pearson Education

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Code: SCGE601010 (1 credit)

Learning Outcomes:

Able to examine the application of geographical theory and method as well as spatial information technology.

Purpose :

Apply technical skills to use survey and mapping methods and equipment effectively to produce the required maps

Subject :

Mapping survey practicum with field survey ethics and rules; survey scoping and planning; various sources of field data; introduction to survey types and tools (base maps, GPS, measuring instruments, etc.); the type and selection of survey methods; navigation system; field adaptation; procedures and methods for reporting survey and mapping results.

Reference 

  1. Charles D. & W. Paul R. Elementary Surveying: An Introduction to Geomatics – 14th edition. 2015. Pearson Education.
  2. Soil Surveying Team. Soil Surveying Module. 2012. Department of Geography.
  3. Lecturer Team. GPS module. 2017. Department of Geography FMIPA UI.

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Code: SCGE601003 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

Able to examine the application of basic principles of geography at various scales and characteristics of the earth's surface.

Purpose :

Analyzing the spatial symptoms of the physical environment

Subject :

Scope and physical geographical position; basic principles and main concepts of physical geography; main approach; the process and formation of the earth's surface as a geographical phenomenon; Earth's surface physiography and flow patterns; geological cycle and hydrological cycle; identification of physical geography symptoms; mapping in physical geography; anthropogenic factors in physical geography; application of physical geography.

Reference 

  1. J. Huggett. Fundamentals of Geomorphology. 2nd Edition. 2007. Routledge.
  2. Leeder. Physical Process in Earth and Environmental Sciences. 2006. Blackwell.
  3. A. Strahler and A. Strahler. Introducing Physical Geography Third Edition. 2003. John Wiley and Son.

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Code: SCGE601004 (1 credit)

Learning Outcomes:

Able to examine the application of geographical theory and method as well as spatial information technology.

Purpose :

Applying methods and instruments for collecting and processing data on physical geography

Subject :

Introduction to physical geography instruments; topographic map reading; calculation of slopes, river gradients, etc.; methods of classification and delineation of terrain forms; procedures for observing and measuring components of physical geography (rock, soil, water, air); procedures for interpretation and presentation of measurement results.

Reference :

  1. Leeder. Physical Process in Earth and Environmental Sciences. 2006. Blackwell.
  2. Strahler and A. Strahler. Introducing Physical Geography Third Edition. 2003. John Wiley and Son,
  3. A. Strahler and A. Strahler. Laboratory Manual for Physical Geography. 2004. John Wiley & Sons.

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Code: SCGE601005 (3 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to examine the application of basic principles of geography at various scales and characteristics of the earth's surface.
  2. Able to examine the application of geographical theory and method as well as spatial information technology.

Purpose :

Analyzing the spatial phenomena of human life and their interactions with nature

Subject :

The scope and position of human geography; basic principles and important concepts of human geography; main traditions and approaches; human factors as forming geographical phenomena; patterns and forms of human-environment interaction; spatial variations of human development and life forms; spatial behavior and subjective space; spatial adaptation; application of human geography.

Reference :

  1. Boyle. Human Geography : A Concise Introduction. 2015. West Sussex: John Wiley & Sons
  2. Kulby, J. Harner, P. Scrooge. Human Geography in Action. 2013. Wiley & Sons.
  3. RG Golledge, RDJacobson, R. Kitchin, M. Blades. Cognitive Maps, Spatial Abilities, and Human Wayfinding. December 2000. Geographical Review of Japan Series B 73(2): 93-10

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Code: SCGE601002 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to examine the application of basic principles of geography at various scales and characteristics of the earth's surface
  2. Able to examine the application of geographic theory and methods as well as spatial information technology

Purpose :

Reviewing the need and suitability of the application of geographic methods that emphasize the aspects of collecting and presenting geographic data.

Subject :

Introduction to scientific procedures; understanding of methods and methodologies; procedures and scope of geographical scientific work; types and sources of geographic data; geomer and spatial analysis unit; maps and geographic information; survey method and field observation; sampling method; interview methods and questionnaire preparation; data processing methods; spatial classification and categorization; data presentation methods (maps, graphs, charts, matrices, etc.).

Reference :

  1. Getis, MD Bjellend, & V. Getis. Introduction to Geography. 2017. McGraw Hill Education: NY
  2. A. Matthews, & TV Herbert. geography, A Very Short Introduction. 2008. Oxfod University Press: NY, USA
  3. N. Clifford, S. French, & G. Valentine. Key Methods in Geography. 2010. Sage Publications: LA, USA & London, UK

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Code: SCGE601011 (4 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective.
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories.

Purpose :

Interpreting physical geographic phenomena based on the systemic processes that underlie their formation.

Subject :

Earth's surface physical systems; controlling factors for the earth's surface formation process; geological, climatological, and fluvial processes; structural formation; formations resulting from weathering, erosion, and deposition; the dynamics and processes of the physical geography of the tropics; landform and its main features.

Reference :

  1. W Christopherson. Geosystems, Introduction to Physical Geography. 8th Editions. 2008. Prentice Hall Publications
  2. J. Hugget. Fundamentals of Geomorphology. 2nd Editions. 2007. Routledge
  3. T. Dave & NW Quinn. Fundamentals of Hydrology. 2019. Routledge.

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Code: SCGE601012 (1 credit)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to examine the application of geographic theory and methods as well as spatial information technology
  2. Able to validate geographic data and information.

Purpose :

Reviewing the suitability of geographic data and methods for the study of physical geography.

Subject :

Observation and measurement of climatological, and fluvial geological processes; identification of structural formations; identification of the results of weathering, erosion, and deposition; climate data processing; identification of watersheds and river orders; identification of land forms.

Reference :

  1. W. Van Bemmelen. The Geology of Indonesia, Vol 1A. 1949 The Hague. Martius Nijhoff.
  2. A. van Zuidam. Aerial Photo Interpretation in Terrain Analysis and Geomorphological Mapping. 1985. ITC.
  3. Wirjohamidjojo & YS Swarinoto. Agricultural Meteorological Practice. 2007. Meteorology and Geophysics Agency.
  4. World Meteorological Organization. Guide to Climatological Practices No. 100. 2011. World Meteorological Organization (WMO).
  5. Strahler & A. Strahler. Introducing Physical Geography. 2003. John Wiley & Sons.
  6. Triatmodjo. Applied Hydrology. 2010. Beta Offsets.
  7. Noor. Geomorphologisti. 2010. Geological Engineering Study Program, Pakuana University
  8. T. Dave & NW Quinn. Fundamentals of Hydrology. 2019. Routledge

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Code: SCGE601006 (3 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories.
  2. Able to validate geographic data and information.

Purpose :

Analyzing geographic phenomena using geographic statistics.

Subject :

Benefits of statistical analysis in geography and related fields; the scope and characteristics of geographic statistics; the concept of spatial relationship and causality; variable selection; the nature of geographic quantitative data; descriptive statistics and inference; statistical methods with multivariable geographical cases; formulation of hypotheses; spatial correlation and auto-correlation; several parametric and non-parametric statistical tests (such as analysis of variance, regression, logistic, chi-square, and factor); spatial analysis methods for the study of variation, distribution, network, and stochastic; integration of geographic statistics and Geographic Information Systems.

Reference :

  1. Peter. Statistical Methods for Geography. 2020. London: SAGE
  2. money. Quantitative methods and applications in GIS. 2006. Taylor & Francis: New York USA
  3. Fotheringham, C. Brunsdon, & M. Charlton, Quantitative Geography. Perspectives on Spatial Data Analysis. 2000. Sage Publications. London.
  4. D McCarroll. Simple Statistical Test for Geography. 2017. CRC Press Taylor & Francis Group.

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Code: SCGE601008 (1 credit)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to examine the application of geographic theory and methods as well as spatial information technology
  2. Able to validate geographic data and information.

Purpose :

Examine the application of methods of collecting, processing, and analyzing quantitative data using statistics in geographic research.

Subject :

Case studies of geographic statistical methods; quantitative data processing using a combination of statistical and mapping software; preparation and processing of data for spatial analysis; application of appropriate geographic statistical methods; practice hypothesis testing; practice of linkage and causality analysis; spatial interpretation of the output.

Reference :

  1. Peter. Statistical Methods for Geography. 2020. London: SAGE
  2. money. Quantitative methods and applications in GIS. 2006. Taylor & Francis: New York USA
  3. Fotheringham, C. Brunsdon, & M. Charlton, Quantitative Geography. Perspectives on Spatial Data Analysis. 2000. Sage Publications. London

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Code: SCGE602016 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to examine the application of geographical theory and method as well as spatial information technology.
  2. Able to validate geographic data and information. 

Purpose :

Examine the application of basic concepts and methods of interpreting digital images to identify the characteristics of the earth's surface.

Subject :

Physics fundamentals for remote sensing; remote sensing systems and procedures; sources and types of data; satellite sensor platforms; image recognition; image processing basics; image interpretation and classification methods; precision test method; and the application of remote sensing for the identification of vegetation, land cover and water bodies.

Reference :

  1. H. Purwadhi, Digital Image Interpretation. 2001. Grasindo Jakarta.
  2. B. Campbell & RH Wynne. Introduction to Remote Sensing. 2011. The Guilford Press.
  3. J.R., Jensen. Introductory Digital Image Processing A Remote Sensing Perspective. 2005. Pearson Prentice Hall.

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Code: SCGE602017 (1 credit)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to examine the application of geographical theory and method as well as spatial information technology.
  2. Able to validate geographic data and information. 

Purpose :

Implementing application programs and digital image interpretation instruments according to the basic principles of remote sensing to generate spatial information.

Subject :

Practical skills in remote sensing application (PJ) programs for digital image processing, image quality improvement, processing error estimation, data grouping, cluster analysis, use of classification methods, image interpretation, accuracy testing, and presentation of final results.

Reference :

  1. H. Purwadhi, Digital Image Interpretation. 2001. Grasindo Jakarta.
  2. B. Campbell & RH Wynne. Introduction to Remote Sensing. 2011. The Guilford Press.
  3. J.R., Jensen. Introductory Digital Image Processing A Remote Sensing Perspective. 2005. Pearson Prentice Hall.

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Code: SCGE602028 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to assess life resource problems based on geographical work procedures
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

Assessing landscape conditions and problems on various characteristics of the earth's surface based on a spatial-ecological perspective.

Subject :

Ecological systems and processes (organism interactions, energy flow, and competition), abundance and diversity, spatial-functional relations of abiotic and biotic components, ecological components and general characteristics of tropical landscapes; tropical landscape type (tropical forest, karst, mangrove, sand beach, swamp, peat, volcanic, etc.); physical environmental processes in landscapes; human influence (social, economic, and cultural) on the landscape environment; the ecological dynamics of the landscape in changing times; landscape phenomena and problems.

Reference :

  1. G Bailey. Ecosystem Geography : From Ecoregions to Sites. 2nd Editions. 2009. Springer
  2. MG Turner & RH Gardner. Landscape Ecology in Theory and Practice. 2015. Springer

Code: SCGE602003 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to examine the application of geographic theory and methods as well as spatial information technology
  2. Able to validate geographic data and information.

Purpose :

Formulate geographic problems into a research design.

Subject :

Scope and conditions of field work 1; preparation of targets and field work plans; preparation and utilization of work maps; preparation of pre-survey data; determination of criteria for data/information sources; preparation of data collection instruments; field data collection practices; processing and data analysis; identification of spatial variation and distribution; presentation and reporting.

Reference :

  1. Field Work Lecture Team 1 (2018). Field Work Module 1. Depok: Department of Geography, FMIPA UI.
  2. Tarbuk & Lutgen (2018). Geography-2. Edition-14. Jakarta: Erlangga.
  3. Daldjoeni, N. (2017). Human Geography.
  4. Jogjakarta: Waves

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Code: SCGE602018 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to validate geographic data and information.
  2. Able to package a variety of geographic information effectively in visual, verbal, and textual forms for relevant parties.

Purpose :

Assessing a simple spatial analysis model based on GIS technology which leads to the evaluation of the model.

Subject :

The essence and scope of Geographic Information Systems (GIS); introduction of geodatabases; spatial data structures; data inventory; tabular and spatial data links; geoprocessing; data correlation; data modeling; compiling and overlaying matrices; query data spatially and tabularly; spatial representation and visualization; application of GIS for geographic analysis.

Reference :

  1. Mitchell. The ESRI Guide to GIS: Analysis. 2005. ESRI. California
  2. Geographic Information Systems: Analysis & Applications. 2018. Depok: Department of Geography, FMIPA UI.
  3. money. Quantitative Methods and Applications in GIS. 2006. Taylor & Francis.
  4. PA Longley, et al. Geographic Information Science and Systems, 4th Edition. 2015. Wiley.

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Code: SCGE602019 (1 credit)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to validate geographic data and information.
  2. Able to package a variety of geographic information effectively in visual, verbal, and textual forms for relevant parties.

Purpose :

Make the basis of a simple GIS-based spatial model according to the model evaluation procedure.

Subject :

Introduction to GIS applications for basic level analysis, data input and management, analysis query for spatial and non-spatial data, matrix overlay, network analysis, and three-dimensional analysis.

Reference :

  1. Mitchell. The ESRI Guide to GIS: Analysis. 2005. ESRI. California
  2. Supriatna, et al. Basics of Geographic Information Systems. 2001. Department of Geography FMIPA UI Depok
  3. money. Quantitative Methods and Applications in GIS. 2006. Taylor & Francis.
  4. PA Longley, et al. Geographic Information Science and Systems, 4th Edition. 2015. Wiley.

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Code: SCGE601005 (4 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories.

Purpose :

Interpreting patterns and forms of spatial organization of human activities as a result of human interaction and the environment.

Subject :

Space as a dynamic and open system; understanding of spatial organization in human geography; human process and the resulting spatial patterns; factors forming spatial organization; theories of spatial organization, spatial organization of rural and urban communities; the impact of changes in the value system; the influence of technological developments; agricultural development, industrialization, urbanization, and changes in lifestyle; sensitivity, identity and commodification of place; territory and territorialization.

Reference :

  1. Hoggart, L. Less, and A. Davies. Researching Human Geography. 2002. London: Hodder Headline Group.
  2. L. Knox and SA Marston. Human Geography: Places and Regions in Global Context, 7th ed. 2016. London: Pearson Education
  3. A. Nayak and A. Jeffrey. Geographical Thought: An Introduction to Ideas in Human Geography. 2011. London and NY: Routledge.

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Code: SCGE602012 (4 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to examine the application of geographic theory and methods as well as spatial information technology
  2. Able to validate geographic data and information.

Purpose :

Examine the suitability of geographic data and methods for the study of human geography.

Subject :

Collecting primary and secondary data on human activities (statistical data, field observations, literature studies, etc.); identification of spatial patterns of human activities, environmental adaptation; components forming spatial organization (spatial interaction); practice the method of spatial visualization of human activities; spatial hierarchical delineation; social space delineation.

Reference :

  1. Hoggart, L. Less, and A. Davies. Researching Human Geography. 2002. London: Hodder Headline Group.
  2. Kitchin & HJ Tate. Conducting Research into Human Geography: Theory, Methodology, and Practice. 2000. Pearson Education Limited.
  3. HF Wilson & J. Darling. Research Ethics for Human Geography. 2020. Sage Publications.

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Code: SCGE601011 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to assess life resource problems based on geographical work procedures
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

Interpreting the dynamics of hydrological components and water resource problems spatially on a local to global scale

Subject :

The concept and scope of hydrogeography; the spatial characteristics of the hydrological system; hydrogeographic components (evapotranspiration, rainfall, and runoff); the influence of physical and human factors on the water balance; spatial and temporal changes in water storage; analysis of water flow behavior; water availability analysis.

Reference :

  1. L. Shelton. Hydroclimatology, Perspectives and Applications. 2009. Cambridge Univ. Press.
  2. Newson, M. Hydrology and the River Environment. 1994. Oxford Univ. Press.
  3. GE Pett & LDL Foster. Rivers and Landscape. 1985. Edward Arnold Publisher.
  4. G. Nagle.  Rivers and Water Management. 2003. Hodder Education

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Code: SCGE602004 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories.

Purpose :

Synthesize human-environment spatial linkages in specific research areas and topics.

Subject :

Scope and terms of field work 2; preparation of field research proposals; explore the possibility of applying a regional approach; identification and confirmation of research problems; study of literature; secondary data analysis; field survey practice; regional synthesis; drawing conclusions; presentation of spatial information, presentation and reporting.

Reference :

  1. S. Fotheringham & PA Rogerson (eds). The SAGE Handbook of Spatial Analysis. 2009. SAGE Publications
  2. M. Pacionne. Applied Geography: Principles and Practices. 1999. Routledge

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Code: SCGE602001 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to submit critical and creative proposals about opportunities for applying the discipline of geography as a solution to life resource problems.
  2. Able to assess the problems of living resources based on geographical work procedures.

Purpose :

Formulate geographic problems into a research design.

Subject :

Terms and criteria of research design; source and authenticity of research ideas; geographical research characteristics and linkages with other disciplines; geographic research design (model); geographical problem scoping and research question formulation; various geographical scientific approaches; the role of theory and previous research (state of the art); maps as instruments and research results; method selection considerations; drawing conclusions (postulates) geographical.

Reference :

  1. Gomez & JP Jones III. Research Methods in Geography A Critical Introduction. 2010. Blackwell Publishing.
  2. Parson & PG Knight. How to Do Your Dissertation in Geography and Related Discipline. 2nd Edition. 2005. Routledge.
  3. GT Wang & K. Park. Student Research and Report Writing, From Topic Selection to Complete Paper. 2016. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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Code: SCGE604030 (3 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

Able to formulate spatial models/synthesis

Purpose :

Synthesize regional development policies and performance by utilizing development theories according to the principles of geographic discipline

Subject :

The essence of regional development in the context of geography and other related disciplines; regional development theories; regional development indicators; application of regional and ecological approaches in regional development; the scope and characteristics of regional development problems in Indonesia and developing countries; the implications of the spatial system and national policies on regional development performance; spatial approach to strategy and evaluation of regional development in Indonesia at various spatial scales.

Reference :

  1. J. Glasson. & T. Marshall. Regional Planning. 2007. Routledge
  2. Rustiadi, E et al. Regional Planning and Development. 2018. Obor Library Foundation.
  3. R. Potter, et al. Key concepts in Development Geography. 2012. Sage Publications
  4. S. Laws, et al. Research for Development. 2013. Sage Publications

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Code: SCGE602014 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories
  2. Able to show maturity, tolerance and adaptation according to scientific, professional, and environmental ethics

Purpose :

Directing the suitability of the application of geography with scientific, professional, environmental and social ethics.

Subject :

Profession and professionalism; the concept of responsibility; ethical and moral dimensions in scientific practice; scientific behavior; social and environmental ethics; ethical dilemmas and issues in technological progress; demands for professionalism in geography; insight into geography and ecology as sources of ethics; scope and criteria of professional geography; self-evaluation of professionalism; professionalism and decision making.

Reference :

  1. M. Bohle (eds). Exploring Geoethics Ethical Implications, Societal Contexts, and Professional Obligations of the Geosciences. 2019. Palgrave Macmillan
  2. M. Wyss & S. Peppoloni. Geoethics, Ethical Challenges and Case Studies in Earth Sciences. 2015. Elsevier
  3. M. Solem, I. Cheung, & MB Schlemper. Skills in Professional Geography: An Assessment of Workforce Needs and Expectations. The Professional Geographer, 60(3) 2008, 356–373
  4. J. Proctor. Ethics in Geography: Giving Moral Form to the Geographical Imagination. Area, March 1998, 30 (1), 8 – 18

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Code: SCGE602029 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to assess life resource problems based on geographical work procedures
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

Assessing the influence of regional climate dynamics on variations in shape, pattern, and quality of life.

Subject :

Variations and spatial-temporal dynamics of climate elements; regional climate concepts; climate classification; macro and micro climate; causes and consequences of climate change; shift of seasons; climate as a form of life; climate and level of welfare; climate and agricultural patterns; climate and health; climatic disasters (floods, droughts, etc.).

Reference :

  1. IM Sandy. Indonesian Regional Climate. 1987. Department of Geography, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences UI
  2. MJ Manton & LA Stevenson. Climate in Asia and the Pacific: Security, Society and Sustainability. 2014. Springer.
  3. M. Parry, et al. Assessing the Cost of Adaptation to Climate Change: A Review of the UNFCCC and Other Recent Estimates. 2009. IEED and Grantham Institute for Climate Change.

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Code: SCGE602031 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to assess life resource problems based on geographical work procedures
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

Interpreting spatial processes in a particular economic system according to the characteristics of the region

Subject :

Spatial elements of the economic system; the influence of location factors on economic mechanisms; linkages and dependencies between economic activities in a spatial context; application of spatial economic theory; comparative and competitive advantage; specialization and trade between regions; economic dynamics at the macro, messo and micro spatial scales; spatial variations of urban and rural economies; interpretation of land use for regional economic landscapes.

Reference :

  1. BJ Berry, EC Conkling, & DM Ray. Global Economy in Transition 2nd Edition. 1997. Prentice Hall International
  2. Sheppard, E. & TJ Barnes. A Companion to Economic Geography. 2003. Blackwell.
  3. NM Coe, PF Kelly, & HC Yeung. Economic Geography: A Contemporary Introduction. 2007. Blackwell Publishing

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Code: SCGE604031 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

Able to formulate spatial models/synthesis

Purpose :

Designing simulations and making GIS models according to the objectives and needs of spatial analysis applications.

Subject :

Characteristics and types of spatial models; spatial modeling and simulation purposes; model definition in GIS applications; data models and representation models in a spatial context; types of spatial simulation models; simulation of spatial patterns and processes; modeling logic; identification and specification of model requirements; GIS modeling criteria and procedures; calibration and verification; spatial modeling application.

Reference :

  1. Supriatna. Geographic Information Systems: Analysis and Applications. 2018. Department of Geography FMIPA UI
  2. D. O'Sullivan & GLW Perry. Spatial Simulation: Exploring Pattern and Process. 2013. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, NY
  3. DL Verbyla. Practical GIS Analysis. 2002. Taylor & Francis, London, UK
  4. K. Vedra. GIS in Environmental Modeling. 1999. International Institute fci' Applied Systems Analysis Laxenburg, Austria
    Publishing

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Code: SCGE602013 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to assess life resource problems based on geographical work procedures
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories.

Purpose :

Assessing land use and availability problems spatially according to regional characteristics.

Subject :

The spatial dimensions of the land; land essence for life/development; the role of natural factors, market mechanisms, socio-cultural, and government policies; type/classification of urban and rural land use; the relationship between physical and human factors; spatial patterns and processes of land use change and their driving factors; land use as a mirror of pattern, quality, and level of life; land as an economic, political, and social commodity; land and development; land use patterns and their changes as a reflection of the patterns and dynamics of life.

Reference :

  1. Kartono, S. Rahardjo, & IM Sandy. Essence of Territorial Development and Planned Land Use. 1998. Department of Geography, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences UI.
  2. Kolers. Land, Conict, and Justice A Political Theory of Territory. 2009. Cambridge University Press
  3. RH Platt. Land Use and Society :
  4. Geography, Law, and Public Policy. 2004. Island Press.

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Code: SCGE602030 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to assess life resource problems based on geographical work procedures
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on facts and theories based on geographical work procedures

Purpose :

Assessing the spatial patterns and processes of urban development and their impact on the physical, economic, and socio-cultural environment

Subject :

Characteristics and nature of the city; city growth stage; urbanization and urbanism; socio-cultural, economic and environmental dimensions of urban processes; dynamics of the city's internal structure; the role of the city in regional development; the spatial evolution of urban systems; global city and sustainable city; and urban development strategies

Reference :

  1. K. Archer. The City, the Basics. 2013. Routledge
    2. M. Pacione. Urban Geography, A Global Perspective. 2009. Routledge

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Code: SCGE602005 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories
  2. Able to validate geographic data and information.

Purpose :

Analyzing geographical phenomena using qualitative methods.

Subject :

Types and scope of qualitative research; characteristics of qualitative methods in geographic research; the nature of qualitative data; qualitative data sources; qualitative survey design; key informant criteria; qualitative data collection techniques; triangulation procedures; analysis and categorization of qualitative data; interpretation method; inductive process; reporting and presentation of qualitative research.

Reference :

  1. K. Denzin & IS Lincoln. The Handbook of Qualitative Research. 2018. Sage Pub
  2. B. Bungin. Qualitative Research Methods. 2017. King Grafindo.

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Code: SCGE602006 (1 credit)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to examine the application of geographic theory and methods as well as spatial information technology
  2. Able to validate geographic data and information.

Purpose :

Examine the application of methods of collecting, processing, and analyzing qualitative data in geographic research.

Subject :

Practical skills of qualitative methods for the study of geography; data collection (participatory observation, selection of key informants, in-depth interviews, mental maps); processing and data analysis; data triangulation; coding techniques; categorization of data based on themes and cases; data interpretation (perceptual space, symbolic meaning, etc.), report writing.

Reference :

  1. K. Denzin & IS Lincoln. The Handbook of Qualitative Research. 2018. Sage Pub
  2. B. Bungin. Qualitative Research Methods. 2017. King Grafindo.

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Code: SCGE604029 (4 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

Able to formulate spatial models/synthesis

Purpose :

Carry out a regional synthesis of variations in the use and problems of living resources in the Indonesian Archipelago

Subject :

Characteristics of the territory of Indonesia as a tropical archipelagic country; administration and governance; the history of the formation of the islands; implications for the location and shape of the islands; Indonesia's regional climate; regional physiographic variations; distribution and condition of natural resources; development of life; pattern of utilization of natural resources in a broad sense (agriculture, mining industry, etc.); application of the principles of regional geography to synthesize the relationship between humans and the environment; unique place in Indonesia.

Reference :

  1. IM Sandy. Republic of Indonesia: Regional Geography. 1985. Indograph Bakti
  2. IM Sandy. Indonesian Regional Climate. 1987. Department of Geography, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences UI
  3. Geospatial Information Agency. Indonesian National Atlas Books 1-3. 2011

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Code: SCGE604007 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to show maturity and confidence in exploring intellectual curiosity according to the needs of society in a professional manner
  2. Able to submit critical and creative proposals about opportunities for applying the discipline of geography as a solution to life resource problems

Purpose :

Designing presentations and arguments about the application of geographical ideas to a source of life problem

Subject :

Final project idea; oral and visual presentations; effective presentation techniques; preparation of the outline of the presentation material; visualization of geographic data and information: map-based communication; systematic logic and argumentation; and ethics in scientific discussion.

Reference :

  1. M. Pacione. Applied Geography: Principles and Practice. 1999. Routledge.
  2. T. Parson & PG Knight. How to Do Your Dissertation in Geography and Related Discipline. 2nd Edition. 2005. Routledge
  3. GT Wang & K. Park. Student Research and Report Writing, From Topic Selection to Complete Paper. 2016. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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Code: SCGE602032 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to assess life resource problems based on geographical work procedures
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

Assessing patterns and problems of the quality of life of the population and their relationship to variations in population mobility in various regional characteristics

Subject :

The basic concept of the quality of life of the population; various quality of life indicators; spatial dimensions of quality of life; approaches, analytical techniques, and demographic-spatial parameters in the study of quality of life; population pressure; the relationship between quality of life and population mobility; population mobility theory; types and spatial patterns of population mobility; rural-urban migration and urban commuters; migrant workers and remittances.

Reference :

  1. H. James, (eds.). Population, Development, and the Environment: Challenges to Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals in the Asia Pacific. 2019. Palgrave Macmillan.
  2. BRJ Sinha (ed). Multidimensional Approach to Quality of Life Issues, A Spatial Analysis. 2019. Springer.
  3. CM Aybek, J. Huinink, & R. Muttarak (eds.), Spatial Mobility, Migration, and Living Arrangements. 2015. Springer
    Publishing

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Study Program Elective Courses

Physical Geography

GIS and PJ

Human Geography

Code: SCGE603701 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

Able to analyze the forms, patterns, and distribution processes of plant and animal life in relation to human life in various place conditions. 

Subject :

  1. Biogeographic processes and patterns: speciation, diversification, extinction, dispersal, distribution
  2. Conditions of animals and plants based on the concept of ecological biogeography: habitats, environments, niches, climate and life, substrate and life, topography and life, disturbance, populations and interacting populations, communities and communities change
  3. Conditions of animals and plants based on historical biogeographic concepts: Dispersal & diversification in the distant past; Vicariance in the distant past; past community change,
  4. Conditions of animals and plants based on the concept of conservation biogeography: Conserving species & populations, Conserving communities & ecosystems.

Reference :

  1. Matthews, JA and Herbert, TV (2008). Geography, A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press: New York
  2. Sandy, IM (1973). The Essence of Geography. Department of Geography, FMIPA University of Indonesia
  3. Hugget, RJ 1998. Fundamentals of Biogeography. Routledge Fundamentals of Physical Geography. London and New York. Hall.

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Code: SCGE603703 (3 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

If students are given topographic maps, geological maps, land use maps, satellite images and hydrological data, students are able to analyze the spatial variations of fluvial processes that occur in a watershed.

Subject :

  1. Fluvial system
  2. Sediment sources and large-scale sediment transfer
  3. Types of rivers, their forms and changes
  4. Channel morphology via satellite image
  5. Changes in channel morphology in a river flow
  6. The influence of human activities either directly or indirectly on fluvial processes in a river flow.

Reference :

  1. Matthews, JA and Herbert, TV (2008). Geography, A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press: New York
  2. Sandy, IM (1973). The Essence of Geography. Department of Geography, FMIPA University of Indonesia
  3. Hugget, RJ 1998. Fundamentals of Biogeography. Routledge Fundamentals of Physical Geography. London and New York. Hall.

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Code: SCGE603704 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

Able to understand the basics of land resource assessment and soil conservation management on the basis of erosion prediction quantities, and can use them to synthesize and evaluate land resources spatially and temporally and package them effectively and relevantly in verbal and textual form

Subject :

  1. Basic concepts of geology-geomorphology
  2. Landforms and processes due to tectonic, volcanism, fluvial (groundwater and surface water), marine-(sea waves), glacial (glaciers), eolin, solutional (karst), organisms and extraterrestrial bodies
  3. Phenomena and applications of geomorphological studies
  4. Climatic and hydrological systems and their relevance in the study of geography

Reference :

  1. Lobeck, AK, 1939, Geomorphology : An Introduction to The Study of Landscapes, McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York-London.
  2. Worcester, Philip G., 1964. A Textbook of Geomorphology, D. Van Nostrnd Co. Inc., Princeton-New Jersey-Toronto-London-New York
  3. Thornbury, William D., 1969. Principles of geomorphology, John Wiley-New York.
  4. Hugget, Richard J., 2007. Fundamentals of Geomorphology. New York: Taylor and Francis. Parts 1-3.
  5. Sparks, BW, 1961. Geomorphology, Longmans, Green and Co. Toronto. Chapters 1,2,5,6,7 and 10.
  6. Hugget, Richard J., 2007. Fundamentals of Geomorphology. New York: Taylor and Francis. Parts 1-3.
  7. Hess, Darrell & Dennis G. Tassa (2016): Physical Geography: A Landscape Appreciate. Pearson New International.
  8. Christopherson, Robert W. (2008) Geosystems, Introduction to Physical Geography. 8th Edition. Prentice Hall Publications, New York.
  9. Holden, Joseph (eds) (2008): Introduction to Physical Geography and Environment. Pearson Education. London.
  10. Petersen, J. et al. (2011) Fundamentals of Physical Geography. Brook/Cole Cencage Learning. New York, 499 p.
  11. Barry, RG & RJ Chorley 1998) Atmosphere, Weather & Climate, Routledge, London
  12. Davie, T. (2008): Fundamentals of Hydrology. Routledge. 2nd Edition.
  13. André Musy & Christophe Higy (2011) Hydrology, A Science of Nature. Science Publisher.
  14. Ludiro, Djamang et al, 1985, Applied Geomorphology, Department of Geography, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Indonesia, Jakarta.
  15. Hefferan, K., John O'Brien. (2010). Earth Material. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.
  16. Younger, Paul L. (2006) Groundwater in the Environment. Wiley, USA

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Code: SCGE603709 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

Able to apply the concept of urban climatology to explain urban climate phenomena and can further analyze the spatial and temporal variations that occur based on a geographical perspective

Subject :

  1. Urban climate concepts and scale
  2. Cities and cities as ecosystems
  3. Urban climate measurement and monitoring methods
  4. Characteristics of components of the urban atmosphere 
  5. Urban climate and people

Reference :

  1. R. OK, et al. (2017): Urban Climates. Cambridge Univ. Press 
  2. Helmut E. Landsberg 1980): The Urban Climate. Inter. Geophysics Series Vol. 28. Academic Press. New York.

  3. Musco (ed,) (2016): Counteracting Urban Heat Island Effects in a Global Climate Change Scenario. SpringerOpen

  4. Journal “Urban Climate” Elsevier-Science Direct

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Code: SCGE603710 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

Able to understand the basic principles of the occurrence of various coastal forms as a result of endogenous and exogenous forces as well as interactions between elements of the earth's surface (atmosphere, biosphere, lithosphere, anthroposphere, hydrosphere) and can identify them from sketches, maps, or images and be able to analyze and synthesize these events in space and time

Subject :

  1. Beach building material
  2. The process of forming the beach
  3. The shape of the beach
  4. The form of coastal land that occurs and its use for humans

Reference :

  1. Davidson-Arnott, R. 2010.An Introduction to Coastal Process and Geomorphology. Cambridge University Press. The Edinburgh Building, Cambridge.
  2. Bird, E. 2008. Coastal Geomorphology. An Introduction. Second Edition.
  3. John Wiley & Sons. England
    Pethick, J. 1995. An Introduction to Coastal Geomorphology. Edward Arnold. A member of the holder Headline Group. London
  4. Sulaiman, A & I. Soehardi. 2008. Introduction to Quantitative Coastal Geomorphology. BPPT
  5. Journal of coastal geomorphology
  6. French, FW 1997. Coastal and Estuary Management. Routledge. London & New York
  7. Guo, H., & Jiao, JJ 2009. Coastal Groundwater system changes in response to large-scale land reclamation. Nova Science Publishers Inc., New York.

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Code: SCGE603711 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

Able to understand the characteristics and physico-chemical properties of the oceans and their relation to climate patterns, distribution of marine biota, coastal forms, and applications in the marine sector, and able to present systematically both in writing and orally.

Subject :

  1. Introduction to Oceanography
  2. Concept of Oceanography
  3. Physical Characteristics of the Sea (Sea Geology, Coastlines, Coastal Morphological Formation, Coral Reef Formation, Seabed Morphological Formation)
  4. Bathymetry (Bathymetric Mapping, Ocean Currents, Tides)
  5. Chemical Properties of Seawater (Ocean Chemical Composition)
  6. Salinity (Seawater Salinity and Salinity at river mouths and estuaries)
  7. Oxygen Level
  8. Seabed Morphological Formation
  9. Bathymetry
  10. Modeling in GIS
  11. Applications in GIS

Reference :

  1. Grant Gross, M. (1977). “Oceanography a view of the earth”. Prentice-Hall, Inc.
  2. Dadang KM, Soenaryo, M. Ali, (1982). "Introduction to Oceanography", Diktat lecture Jur. Geophysics and Meteorology, ITB.
  3. S. Hutabarat and SM Evans. (1985). "Introduction to Oceanography". University of Indonesia,
  4. Nontji, A. (1993). "The Archipelago Sea". bridge,
  5. A. Supangat and Susanna. (2003). "Introduction to Oceanography". PS. Oceanography, Dept., GM, ITB
  6. J, J, Bhatt, D. Van N. Company, 1978. “Oceanography”. McGraw Hill. Inc., New York.

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Code: SCGE603712 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

Apply and analyze the watershed concept as a hydrological system.

Subject :

  1. Watershed concept. and Dynamics of water resources
  2. The concept of a watershed as a hydrological system
  3. Process and utilization of water resources
  4. Water Balance Quality and Quantity
  5. Water pollution
  6. Techniques for monitoring water sampling locations in settlements

Reference :

  1. Soeprapto. (2001). Hydrographic Survey. Gadjah Mada University Press, Yogyakarta.
  2. Downs, Peter W. & KJ Gregory. (2004). River Channel Management, toward sustainable catchment hydrosystem. Arnold. London, UK.
  3. Newson, M. (1994): Land, water and development: river basin system and their sustainable management. Routledge, London. McGraw Hill. Inc., New York.

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Code: SCGE603718 (3 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

Able to explain the concept of climate change (PI), analyze the phenomenon of climate change and its spatial and temporal impacts on life on earth, as well as vulnerability to climate change.

Subject :

  1. The basic concept of climate change 
  2. Factors driving climate change
  3. Impact of climate change
  4. Climate change adaptation and mitigation efforts 

Reference :

  1. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. (2021). AR6 Climate Change 2021: The Physical Science Base . Contribution of Working Group I to the Sixth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Masson-Delmotte, V., P. Zhai, A. Pirani, SL Connors, C. Péan, S. Berger, N. Caud, Y. Chen, L. Goldfarb, MI Gomis, M. Huang, K. Leitzell, E. Lonnoy, JBR Matthews, T. Maycock, T. Waterfield, O. Yelekçi, R. Yu, and B. Zhou (eds.)]. Cambridge University Press. In Press.
  2. Fares, A. (2021). Climate Change and Extreme Events. Elsevier.
  3. Cracknell, AP, & Varotsos, CA (2021). Understanding Global Climate Change: Modeling the Climatic System and Human Impacts. CRC Press.
  4. Newton, DE (2020). The Climate Change Debate: A Reference Handbook. ABC-CLIO
  5. Uscinski, JE, K. Douglas, S. Lewandowsky, JE Uscinski, K. Douglas, and S. Lewandowsky, 2017, Climate Change Conspiracy Theories, in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Climate Science: Oxford University Press.
  6. https://www.ipcc.ch/reports/
  7. https://science2017.globalchange.gov/

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Code: SCGE603720 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

Able to analyze physical (natural) and human disasters systematically and spatially, disaster impacts, and regional spatial planning according to regional disaster conditions

Subject :

  1. The concept and scope of Disaster Geography
  2. Physical Disaster Data Inventory
  3. Social Disaster Data Inventory
  4. Natural Disaster Data Inventory
  5. Disaster Vulnerability
  6. Disaster Capacity
  7. Disaster Risk Analysis
  8. Disaster Adaptation and Mitigation
  9. Disaster Risk Management
  10. Emergency response and post-disaster rehabilitation
  11. Analyzing the impact of Disaster
  12. Analyzing Development planning according to disaster potential

Reference :

  1. Birkmann, J. 2006, Measuring Vulnerability to Natural Jazards : Towards Disaster Resilient Societies. Uniter Nations University Press Tokyo New York Paris.
  2. Keller & DeVecchio. 2015. Natural Hazards Earth's processes as hazard, disaster, and catastrophes. Routledge Taylor and Francis Group London and New York.
  3. Van Westen. 2017. Environmental Hazards Methodologies for Risk Assessment and Management. ResearchGate.
  4. Rachmawati, D. Rahmawati, A. Susilo, 2018. Spatial-based Disaster Risk Reduction. UB Press Malang

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Code: SCGE603721 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

Able to analyze Natural Disaster Risk in the context of physical, social and economic systematically and spatially, disaster impacts, as well as regional spatial planning according to regional disaster conditions

Subject :

  1. Concept and scope of Disaster Risk
  2. Natural Disaster Risk Data Inventory
  3. Inventory of Social Disaster Risk Data
  4. Natural Disaster Data Inventory on the Economy
  5. Natural Disaster Risk Analysis
  6. Thematic Application of Natural Disaster Risk Analysis
  7. Application of Natural Disaster Risk Analysis in certain ecosystems
  8. Natural Disaster Risk Management
  9. Analyzing Development planning according to the results of natural disaster risk analysis

Reference :

  1. Birkmann, J. 2006, Measuring Vulnerability to Natural Jazards : Towards Disaster Resilient Societies. Uniter Nations University Press Tokyo New York Paris.
  2. Keller & DeVecchio. 2015. Natural Hazards Earth's processes as hazard, disaster, and catastrophes. Routledge Taylor and Francis Group London and New York.
  3. Van Westen. 2017. Environmental Hazards Methodologies for Risk Assessment and Management. ResearchGate.
  4. Rachmawati, D. Rahmawati, A. Susilo, 2018. Spatial-based Disaster Risk Reduction. UB Press Malang
  5. Izumi, T., Shaw, R., Ishiwatari, et.al. 2019. 30 innovations for Disaster Risk Reduction. United Nations Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Disaster Risk Reduction.

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Code: SCGE603722 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

Able to explain the concepts and principles of hydrometeorological modeling

Subject :

  1. Introduction and scope of hydrometeorological modeling studies
  2. The basic concepts of meteorological modeling
  3. Monitoring of regional meteorological conditions: measurement and remote sensing database
  4. Statistical prediction method
    Result verification method
  5. Utilization of observational rainfall data and satellite models
  6. Meteorological drought models: SPI and SPEI
  7. Meteorological model of flood rainfall based on statistics
  8. Hydrological model of flood discharge with HEC-HMS
  9. Flood hydrometeorological model with HEC-RAS

Reference :

  1. Sene, K. 2009. Hydrometeorology: Forecasting and Applications. Springer Dordrecht Heidelberg London New York
  2. Triatmodjo, B. (2008) Applied Hydrology. Beta Offset
  3. USA USACE. 2000. Hydrologic Modeling System HEC-HMS: Technical Reference Manual.
  4. USA USACE. 2016. HEC-RAS 5.0 User's Manual Representative of the Secretary-General for Disaster Risk Reduction.

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Code: SCGE603723 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

Able to analyze coastal concepts and management principles in relation to physical, biota, and social factors both through regional and topical geographic approaches

Subject :

  1. Introduction to Coastal Geography
  2. Definition of Coastal Geography
  3. Coastal Boundary
  4. Characteristics of the Coastal Area
  5. Characteristics of Coastal and Marine Areas
    Ecosystems in Coastal and Marine Areas
  6. Utilization of Resources in Coastal and Marine Areas
  7. Management Model in Coastal and Marine Areas

Reference :

  1. Bird, EFC 1984. Coasts. Englem. New York.
  2. Clark, J. 1974. Coastal Ecosystem: Ecological Considerations for Management of the Coastal Zone, The Conservation Foundation. Washington DC
  3. Dahuri, R. 2003. Marine Biodiversity, Indonesia's sustainable development asset. PT Gramedia Pustaka Utama. Jakarta.
  4. Duxbury, et al. 2002. Fundamentals of Oceanography (fourth edition). The McGraw-Hill Company. New York USA.
  5. Wibisono. 2005. Introduction to Marine Science. PT Gramedia Widiasarana Indonesia. Jakarta.
  6. Nontji, A. 1987. Archipelago Sea. bridge. Jakarta.

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Code: SCGE603801 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to validate geographic data and information
  2. Able to package a variety of geographic information effectively in visual, verbal, and textual forms for relevant parties

Purpose :

Able to apply and understand concepts, perform and explain Navigation Satellite System technology for various fields of mapping, transportation, economics, and other fields related to spatial. Able to distinguish the use of Satellite Systems for Navigation and Geodetic, as well as their applications in understanding geographical phenomena

Subject :

  1. Basic Concepts of Surveying and Mapping Using a Navigation Satellite System
  2. History of Navigation Satellite Systems and Mapping Using Navigation Satellite Systems
  3. Explain the concept of mapping using the Navigation Satellite System
  4. Use of the Navigation Satellite System on smartphones
  5. Explain the types of navigation and Location satellites such as GPS, Glonass, Beidou, QZSS, Galileo and other satellites
  6. GNSS concept
  7. Mapping Applications in various fields (Physical Geography)
  8. Mapping Applications in various fields (Human Geography or Regional Development)
  9. Mapping Applications in various fields of Geographic Information System Applications and Remote Sensing

Reference :

  1. Kraak, Menno-Jan; Ormeling, F. (2010). Visualization of Spatial Data Third Edition. In Pearson Education (Third). Edinburgh Gate, London: Pearson Education Limited. (Chapter 2 and Chapter 5)
  2. Guochang, X. ; Yan X. (2016). GPS: Theory, Algorithms and Applications (Third Edit). Berlin: Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

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Code: SCGE603803 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to validate geographic data and information
  2. Able to package a variety of geographic information effectively in visual, verbal, and textual forms for relevant parties

Purpose :

Able to analyze spatial phenomena by utilizing radar remote sensing technology

Subject :

  1. Basic concepts and characteristics of radar remote sensing
  2. Radiometric and geometric correction of radar images
  3. Visual and digital interpretation of radar images
  4. Interferometric and polarimetric methods for the interpretation of radar images
  5. Radar images of land, water and atmosphere

Reference :

  1. Lillesand, T. M, RW Kiefer & Jonathan W. Chipman. 2004. Remote Sensing and Image Interpretation, 5Th Ed. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
  2. Richards, J.A. 2009. Remote Sensing with Imaging Radar. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.
  3. Soergel, U. 2010. Radar Remote Sensing of Urban Areas. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.
  4. Lusch, DP 1999. Introduction to Microwave Remote Sensing. Center for Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Science, Michigan State University
  5. Cheney, M & Brett Borden. 2009. Fundamentals of Radar Imaging. Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics

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Code: SCGE603804 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to validate geographic data and information
  2. Able to package a variety of geographic information effectively in visual, verbal, and textual forms for relevant parties

Purpose :

Able to analyze objects using multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing images based on the basic principles of remote sensing

Subject :

  1. The basic concepts of multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing
  2. Basic physics of multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing
  3. Characteristics of multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing images
  4. The basic principles of multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing data processing
  5. Multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing data analysis

Reference :

  1. Borengasser, Hungate and Watkins, 2007, Hyperspectral remote sensing: Principle and applications, Taylor and Francis, London
  2. Lillesand, Kiefer and Chipman, 2005. Remote Sensing and image interpretation, fifth edition, John Willey and Sons, Singapore
  3. John R Jensen. 2005. Introductory Digital Image Processing A Remote Sensing Perspective. Pearson Prentice Hall. United States of America. 2005
  4. Aronof, Stand. 2005. Remote Sensing for GIS Managers. California: ESRI Press
    Industrial and Applied Mathematics

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Code: SCGE603805 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to validate geographic data and information
  2. Able to package a variety of geographic information effectively in visual, verbal, and textual forms for relevant parties

Purpose :

Capable formulate and create spatial database management using Geographic Information System software

Subject :

  1. Basic Concepts of Spatial Database Management in GIS
  2. Benefits and uses of GIS Database Management
  3. Procedures in Spatial Database Management in GIS
  4. Spatial Database Management Formulation for Specific Case Studies
  5. Application of MBDS Procedures in Making MBDS Specific Case Studies

Reference :

  1. Supriatna, (2001), Basics of Geographic Information Systems. Department of Geography FMIPA UI, Depok, Indonesia
  2. Supriatna (2009): Geographic Information Systems, Analytics & Applications. Department of Geography FMIPA UI, Depok, Indonesia
  3. David L. Verbyla, (2002): Practical GIS Analysis, Taylor & Francis, London, UK
  4. Edy Irwansyah (2013),Geographic Information Systems: Basic Principles and Application Development (2013), DIGIBOOKS, Yogjakarta, Indonesia

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Code: SCGE603809 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to validate geographic data and information
  2. Able to package a variety of geographic information effectively in visual, verbal, and textual forms for relevant parties

Purpose :

Able to provide in assessing and analyzing related measurements and descriptions of physical features of oceans, seas, coasts, lakes and rivers, as well as with predictions of changes over time, with the primary objective of safety of navigation and support of all other marine activities

Subject :

  1. Introduction to Hydrographic Surveying.
  2. Concept Datum survey and map coordinates.
  3. Concept of vertical datum and tides.
  4. Positioning and navigation system concept
  5. Publication concept (sound)
  6. side survey concept sonar scan
  7. Data processing concept
  8. Hydrographic survey project management concept

Reference :

  1. Yudho, Pranoto (2020). Hydrographic Survey (For Surveyors and Marine Practitioners). Yogyakarta: KBM Indonesia. Publisherbukumurah.com.
  2. Poerbandono & Djuarsah (2005). Hydrographic Survey. Bandung: PT. Refika Aditama.
  3. Pushidrosal (2019). Hydrographic and Oceanographic Competency Qualification Standards in Support of Hydro-Oceanographic Surveys). Jakarta: Center for Hydrography and Oceanography of the Indonesian Navy.
  4. BSN. (2016). Hydrographic survey using single beam echo sounder. Jakarta: National Standardization Agency.
  5. Fahrurrazi, D. (2011). Geodetic Reference System: from the Bigbang to the terrestrial frame of reference. Yogyakarta: Gadjah Mada University Press

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Code: SCGE603811 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to validate geographic data and information
  2. Able to package a variety of geographic information effectively in visual, verbal, and textual forms for relevant parties

Purpose :

Able to formulate the results of regional geospatial data collection based on proper planning, methods that are in accordance with the survey concept, process data with various techniques and formulas in accordance with regional planning principles and perform data analysis to then compile it into a scientific paper that can be justified.

Subject :

  1. Introduction to Hydrographic Surveying.
  2. Concept Datum survey and map coordinates.
  3. Concept of vertical datum and tides.
  4. Positioning and navigation system concept
  5. Publication concept (sound)
  6. side survey concept sonar scan
  7. Data processing concept
  8. Hydrographic survey project management concept

Reference :

  1. Yudho, Pranoto (2020). Hydrographic Survey (For Surveyors and Marine Practitioners). Yogyakarta: KBM Indonesia. Publisherbukumurah.com.
  2. Poerbandono & Djuarsah (2005). Hydrographic Survey. Bandung: PT. Refika Aditama.
  3. Pushidrosal (2019). Hydrographic and Oceanographic Competency Qualification Standards in Support of Hydro-Oceanographic Surveys). Jakarta: Center for Hydrography and Oceanography of the Indonesian Navy.
  4. BSN. (2016). Hydrographic survey using single beam echo sounder. Jakarta: National Standardization Agency.
  5. Fahrurrazi, D. (2011). Geodetic Reference System: from the Bigbang to the terrestrial frame of reference. Yogyakarta: Gadjah Mada University Press

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Code: SCGE603812 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to validate geographic data and information
  2. Able to package a variety of geographic information effectively in visual, verbal, and textual forms for relevant parties

Purpose :

Able to build a web or mobile-based mapping application by paying attention to user interface design (UI) and user experience (UX)

Subject :

  1. History, concepts and applications of WebGIS
  2. WebGIS basic components and architecture
  3. User interface (UI) and user experience (UX) design principles
  4. Mobile GIS Concept
  5. Combination of geospatial data (geospatial data mashup)
  6. WebGIS Application
  7. function and widget in WebGIS applications
  8. Operational dashboard
  9. Storytelling with geospatial data
  10. WebGIS application publication
  11.  

Reference :

  1. Fu, Pinde & Jiulin Sun. 2011. Web GIS: Principles and Applications. California: ESRI Press

  2. Neumann A. (2016) Web Mapping and Web Cartography. In: Shekhar S., Xiong H., Zhou X. (eds) Encyclopedia of GIS. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-23519-6_1485-2
    Robson, R & Eric Freeman. 2005. Head First HTML with CSS & XHTML. O'Reilly Media, Inc.

  3. Fu, Pinde. Getting to Know Web GIS, fourth edition. 2020. ESRI Press

  4. Harder. C. & Clint Brown. 2017. The ArcGIS Book: 10 Big Ideas about Applying The Science of Where. ESRI Press.

  5. Duvander, A. 2010. Map Scripting 101: An Example-Driven Guide to Building Interactive Maps With Bing, Yahoo!, and Google Maps. San Francisco: No Starch Press, Inc.

  6. W. Tang & J. Selwood, Connecting Our World: GIS Web Services. 2003. ESRI Press.

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Code: SCGE603816 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to validate geographic data and information
  2. Able to package a variety of geographic information effectively in visual, verbal, and textual forms for relevant parties

Purpose :

Able to formulate and make computing and customization with Geographic Information Systems. The programming language used is Python on the Google Colab platform.

Subject :

  1. Basic theory of geocomputing and customization
  2. Cloud computing theory, geospatial rest-api, cloud geodatabase
  3. Basic Python Theory: variables, data structures, mathematical operations, loops, and conditions
  4. Python libraries for spatial data: OGR, geopandas, arcpy, arcgis, rasterio, scripy, shapely. Fiona
  5. Arcgis API theory
  6. Machine learning theory for spatial data
  7. Deep learning theory for spatial data

Reference :

  1. Suyanto, KNR, & Mandala, S. (2019). Deep Learning Machine Learning Modernization For Big Data. informatics.
  2. full moon. B. (2019). Pintroduce Machine Learning. informatics
  3. Lawhead, J. (2019). Learning Geospatial Analysis with Python: Understand GIS fundamentals and perform remote sensing data analysis using Python 3.7. Packt Publishing Ltd.
  4. Yahya Heryadi and Edy Irwansyah (2018) Deep Learning and Its Applications in the Geospatial Field

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Code: SCGE603819 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to validate geographic data and information
  2. Able to package a variety of geographic information effectively in visual, verbal, and textual forms for relevant parties

Purpose :

Able to apply and analyze the concept of a project topographic/bathymetric mapping, field preparation, determination of coordinates, initial azimuth, field measurements, and bathymetry mapping, as well as topographical and bathymetric drawings

Subject :

  1. Introduction to Topographic Mapping
  2. Topographic Mapping Concept (Land)
  3. Measurement Methods (Field Survey, Boundary Designation and Benchmarking, Area Measurement, Data Processing, Drawing, Reports)
  4. Cut and Fill Analysis
  5. Topographical Mapping Regional Analysis
  6. Bathymetric Mapping Concepts and Technology
  7. Explanation of the Concept of Bathymetry (Water) Mapping (Field Survey, Indicating Measurement Area Boundaries, Area Measurement, Processing Data, Drawings, Reports
  8. Topographical analysis of the bottom of the water
  9. Bathymetric mapping regional analysis

Reference :

  1. Frick, H. (1979). Soil Measuring Instruments and Their Use. Yogyakarta: Kanisius Foundation, Senopati.
  2. Keats, D. (2001): Cartographic Design and Production. London: John Wileys & Sons.
  3. Jupp, DLB (1988). Bbackground And Extensions To Depth Of Penetration (DOP) Mapping In Shallow Coastal Waters. In: Proceedings Of The Symposium On Remote Sensing Of The Coastal Zone, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia, pp. IV.2.1 – IV.2.19, September 1988.
  4. Poerbandono and Djunasjah. (2005). Hydrographic Survey. Refika Aditama, Bandung. Sasmita, DK, 2008, Multibeam Echosounder (MBES) Application for Bathymetric Purposes. Thesis, Department of Geodetic Engineering, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Planning, Bandung Institute of Technology, Bandung. 
  5. Soeprapto. (2001). Hydrographic Survey. Gadjah Mada University Press, Yogyakarta.

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Code: SCGE603820 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to validate geographic data and information
  2. Able to package a variety of geographic information effectively in visual, verbal, and textual forms for relevant parties

Purpose :

Able to provide study, analysis and modeling related to survey, mapping and remote sensing (PJ) for land and sea waters, interpretation of oceanic coasts, estuaries, depth variations, and water quality. PJ modeling on water

Subject :

  1. Introduction to aquatic remote sensing. 
  2. The concept of survey, mapping and remote sensing (PJ) for inland waters.
  3. Survey, mapping and remote sensing (PJ) concept for marine waters.
  4. Concepts and practice of interpretation and analysis of PJ on the ocean coast. 
  5. Concepts and practice of interpretation and analysis of PJ in Estuary
  6. Concepts and practice of interpretation and analysis of PJ on variations in sea depth (bathymetry)
  7. Concepts and practice of PJ interpretation and analysis on water quality
  8. PJ modeling concepts and practices in water

Reference :

  1. Charles W. Finkl Christopher Makowski (editors) (2014). Remote Sensing & Modeling: Advances in Coastal and Marine Resources. Switzerland: Springer International Publishing.
  2. Aronof, Stand. 2005. Remote Sensing for GIS Managers. California: ESRI Press
  3. John R Jensen. 2005. Introductory Digital Image Processing A Remote Sensing Perspective. Pearson Prentice Hall. United States of America. 
  4. Purwadhi, F. Sri. 2001. Digital Image Interpretation. Jakarta : Grasindo
  5. John A. Richards. 1995. Remote Sensing Digital Image Analysis An Introduction. Australia : Campbell ACT 2600.

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    1.  

Code: SCGE603821 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to validate geographic data and information
  2. Able to package a variety of geographic information effectively in visual, verbal, and textual forms for relevant parties

Purpose :

Able to design the implementation of remote sensing methods in the study of the dynamics of urban and rural areas based on simple software and cloud computing.

Subject :

  1. PJ_DWU Concept
  2. Active and Passive PJ_DWU Sensors and Systems for physical characteristics
  3. Active and Passive PJ_DWU Sensors and Systems for social characteristics
  4. Algorithms and techniques for urban attribute extraction (Deep learning, and GEE) 
  5. Algorithms and techniques for urban attribute extraction (Multi-sensor and multi-scale for urban environment)
  6. Urban Environment Applications (carbon emission mapping, urban micro-climate)
  7. Urban Environment Application (Urban pollution monitoring with PJ)
  8. Urban Environment Application (Green infrastructure)
  9. PJ and SDGs (Green space/LTH, public recreation space)
  10. PJ and SDGs (urban climate, ESG and other indexes)
  11. Case Studies and Dissemination of Results

Reference :

  1. Xiaojun X. Yang (2021) Urban Remote Sensing: Monitoring, Synthesis and Modeling in the Urban Environment, Wiley-Blackwell. 
  2. Mangalasseril Mohammad Anees, Deepika Mann, Mani Sharma, Ellen Banzhaf, and Pawan K Joshi; Assessment of Urban Dynamics to Understand Spatiotemporal Differentiation at Various Scales Using Remote Sensing and Geospatial Tools; Remote Sens. 2020, 12(8), 1306; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12081306
  3. Cheng Li (2014); Monitoring and analysis of urban growth process using Remote Sensing, GIS and Cellular Automata modeling: A case study of Xuzhou city, China; https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/46915947.pdf 
  4. Kerle, N., Jenssen, LLF, and Hurneman, GC (eds) (2004) Principles of Remote Sensing – ITC Educational Textbook Series. The Netherlands: ITC.
  5. Lillesand, TM, Kiefer, RW, Chipman, J. (2008) Remote sensing and Image Interpretation. 6th. NY: John Wiley and Sons.
    1.  

Code: SCGE603822 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to validate geographic data and information
  2. Able to package a variety of geographic information effectively in visual, verbal, and textual forms for relevant parties

Purpose :

Able to design the implementation of remote sensing methods in the study of regional climate dynamics based on simple software and cloud computing

Subject :

  1. PJ_Regional climate concept
  2. PJ_Active and Passive Sensors and Systems to get climate component dataset
  3. Algorithms and techniques for climate component attribute extraction (Deep learning, and GEE) 
  4. Regional climate component monitoring application (atmospheric conditions)
  5. Regional climate component monitoring application (lithospheric conditions)
  6. Regional climate component monitoring application (oceenaographic conditions)
  7. Case Studies and Dissemination of Results

Reference :

  1. Beniston, M., & Verstraete, M. (2001). Remote Sensing and Climate Modeling : Synergies and Limitations. New York: Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  2. Vaughan, R., & P. Cracknell, A. (1994). Remote Sensing and Global Claim Change. Berlin: Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Remote Sensing and Global Climate Change, held at Dundee, Scotland.
    Automata modeling: A case study of Xuzhou city, China; https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/46915947.pdf
  3. Kerle, N., Jenssen, LLF, and Hurneman, GC (eds) (2004) Principles of Remote Sensing – ITC Educational Textbook Series. The Netherlands: ITC.
  4. Lillesand, TM, Kiefer, RW, Chipman, J. (2008) Remote sensing and Image Interpretation. 6th. NY: John Wiley and Sons.

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    1.  

Code: SCGE603823 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to validate geographic data and information
  2. Able to package a variety of geographic information effectively in visual, verbal, and textual forms for relevant parties

Purpose :

Able to review, analyze and synthesize remote sensing applications for spatial and temporal land ecosystem studies, through spatial studies of landscape ecosystems, PJ and GIS technology for spatial studies of land cover/use monitoring, vegetation characteristics, coastal and marine environmental ecosystems, wetlands ( wetland)/swamp, estuary, and lake/situ/reservoir ecosystem.

Subject :

  1. Introduction to Land Ecosystem PJ/GIS
  2. Basic concept of landscape ecosystem.
  3. Concept and study of landscape pattern spatially.
  4. Study of landscape models in ecosystems.
  5. Analysis and synthesis of land cover/use monitoring using GIS/PJ technology.
  6. Analysis and synthesis of vegetation characteristics in various landforms using PJ/GIS technology.
  7. Analysis and synthesis of coastal and marine ecosystem monitoring using PJ/GIS technology.
  8. Analysis and synthesis of wetland ecosystem monitoring using PJ/GIS technology.
  9. Analysis and synthesis of estuary ecosystem monitoring using PJ/GIS technology.
  10. Analysis and synthesis of lake/reservoir/situ ecosystem monitoring using GIS/PJ technology.
  11.  

Reference :

  1. Monica G. Turner Robert H. Gardner (2015). Landscape Ecology in Theory and Practice (Second Edition). Springer New York Heidelberg Dordrecht London © Springer-Verlag New York.
  2. Ned Horning, Julie A. Robinson, Eleanor J. Sterling, Woody Turner, and Sacha Spector (2020-online). Remote Sensing for Ecology and Conservation: A Handbook of Techniques. Oxford University Press.
  3. Lopez, Ricardo, and Frohn, Robert (2019). Remote Sensing for Landscape Ecology: New Metric Indicators. CRC Press
  4. Latifi, Hooman and Valbuena, Ruben (2019). 3D Remote Sensing Applications in Forest Ecology. Mdpi
  5. Tarolli, Paolo and Mudd, Simon (2020). Remote Sensing of Geomorphology. Springer
  6. Almo Farina (1998). Principles and Methods in Landscape Ecology. Chapman and Hall, 2-6 Boundary Row, London SE1 8HN, HK.
  7. Charles W. Finkl Christopher Makowski (editors) (2014). Remote Sensing & Modeling: Advances in Coastal and Marine Resources. Switzerland: Springer International Publishing.
  8. Various International Papers: Modeling landscape-scale habitat use using GIS and remote sensing.

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  1.  

Code: SCGE603901 (3 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

Able to examine the relationship between humans and places

Subject :

  1. Cultural Geography
  2. Places and Culture
  3. Space differentiation and representation

Reference :

  1. J. Bonnemaison. Culture and Space, Conceiving a New Cultural Geography. 2005. IB Tauris
  2. J. Wylie. Landscape. 2007. Routledge
  3. J. Anderson. Understanding Cultural Geography: Places and Traces. 2010. Routledge.

Code: SCGE603902 (3 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

Able to perform power analysis, management and development of ecological space.

Subject :

  1. Understanding ecological systems.
  2. Impact of ecological systems on the environment.
  3. Ecological system as a space.
  4. Ecological space management.
  5. Mastery of ecological space.
  6. The ideal form of an ecological space.
  7. Comparison of the ideal ecological space with the ecological space in their respective areas.
  8. Impact of ecological space management.

Reference :

  1. Eugena P. Odum, Fundamentals of Ecology, Saunders Philadelphia, 1971
  2. WBClaphalm, Jr.,Natural Ecosystems, Mc. Milan Publishing Co., Inc. New York, Collier Mac Millan Publishers London
  3. Joseph M. Moran, Michael Morgan & James H. Wiersma, Introduction to Environmental Science, WHFreeman and Company NY1986
  4. SJMc. Naughton & Larry L. Wolf, General Ecology, Translator: Sunaryo Pringgoseputro, Srigandono, Editor: Sudarsono, Gajah Mada University Press 1990
  5. Oliver S. Owen, Natural Resource Conservation, An Ecological Approach. Mc. Millan Publishing Co., Inc. New York, Collier Mc. Millan Publishers London, 1985
  6. Whitten, T., RE Soeriaatmadja. SA Afif. 1999. Java and Bali Ecology. Indonesian Ecology Series Volume 2. Prenhallindo. Jakarta
  7. Soemarwoto, O. Ecology in Environmentally Friendly Development

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Code: SCGE603907 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

Able to study and analyze the basic principles and spatial analysis of historical data, identify, validate, and assess/interpret the needs, benefits and uses of historical geographic data (from a spatial point of view), as material for spatial analysis and reflection on the advancement of culture

Subject :

  1. Introduction to Historical Geography
  2. Basic Data Sources of Historical Geography
  3. Historical Mapping from secondary and primary data and supporting data
  4. Indonesian History : Geographical Background (strategic location, climate, archipelagic country and natural resources, cultural resources)
  5. Natural science and historical data disclosure 
  6. The history of Indonesian culture and civilization which is the brilliance of the culture of the Indonesian nation.
  7. The history of human migration,
  8. History of Language, Religion in Indonesia 
  9. History of Indonesian Art and Technology
  10. The history of the struggle for national unity and Indonesian independence
  11. Reconstruction of Indonesian cultural history as a lesson for future Indonesian civilization.

Reference :

  1. Abeyasekere, Susan., 1987., Jakarta a history, Oxford University Press., New York.
  2. Al-Faruqi, Ismail and Lois Lamya Al-Faruqi, 1998,. Atlas of Islamic Culture; Exploring the Treasures of Glorious Civilizations. terj, Mizan,. Bandung
  3. Butlin, R.A., 1993., Historical Geography; through the gates of space and time, Loughborough University of Technology, Arnold, London.
  4. Hodder, Ian., 1986., Reading the past; current approaches to interpretation in archaeology., Cambridge University Press, New York.
  5. Made, I Made, 1985, Regional Geography of Indonesia, Department of Geography, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Indonesia, Jakarta.
  6. Rapp, G.jr., and Christopher L. Hill, 1998, Geoarchaeology, Yale University Press, New Haven and London.
  7. Soejono, RP, 1982,. Indonesian National History, Ministry of Education and Culture Directorate of History and Traditional Values, Jakarta
  8. Soekmono, R., 1973, Introduction to the history of Indonesian culture, Kanisus Publisher, Yogyakarta.
  9. Deputy Team for Cultural Development and Preservation, 2004. Vision, Mission and Strategy for the Advancement of Indonesian National Culture, Kemenparbud RI.
  10. Ministry of Education and Culture, 2007. Law NUMBER 5 OF 2017 concerning the Promotion of Culture.
  11. Steele F (1981). The sense of place. CBI Publishing Company, Inc.
  12. Mr YF (1974) Topophilia. Englewood Cliffs, NJ. Prentice-Hall.
  13. Mr YF (1977) Space and Place: The Perspective of Experience. London: Edward Arnold.

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Code: SCGE603908 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

Able to analyze the process and spatial patterns of disease as well as services and health planning strategies based on the physical and social conditions, economy and culture of the community.

Subject :

  1. Concept and Scope of Geokes
  2. Disease Ecology Theory 
  3. Diffusion Theory of Disease 
  4. Spatial approach to Health issues
  5. Socio-Economic Conditions and Health Problems
  6. Cultural Conditions and Health issues
  7. Politics and Health issues
  8. Health services
  9. Health Planning

Reference :

  1. Anthamatten. Peter and Helen Hazen (2011). An Introduction to the geography of health. Routledge, London and New York
  2. Albery. Lan P and Marcus Munafo (2008). Key Concepts in Health Psychology. Sage L.td. London
  3. Albert. Donald P, Wilbert M. Gesler, Barbara Levergood (2005). Spatial Analysis GIS and Remote Sensing Applications in The Health Sciences.  Ann Arbor Press, Chelsea, Michigan USA.
  4. Azwar, A. (1997). Introduction to Epidemiology. Binarupa Aksara, Jakarta
  5. Barton Hugh & Catherine Tsorou (2000). Healthy Urban Planning.. London And New York.
  6. Cockerham. William C. (2010). Medical Sociology. Prentice Hall. London
  7. Fitzpatrick. Kevin and Mark LaGory (2011). Unhealthy Cities Poverty, Race and Place in America. Routledge, New York, USA.
  8. Glanz, Karen, Barbara K. Rimer, K. Viswanath (2008). Health Behavior and Health Education. Theory, Research and Practice. Jossey – Bass, San Francisco, USA.
  9. Haggett, Peter (2001). Geography A Global Synthesis. Prentice Hall, England.
  10. Haggets. Peter (2000).  Advance Geography. Prentice Hall, England
  11. Hetzel, BS (199..) Basic Health Care in Developing Countries. Epidemiology Perspective, Oxford University, New York.
  12. Joseph, AE & Philips (1999 .). Accessibility and Utilization Geographical Perspective On Health Care Delvery. Harper & Row New York.
  13. Kerns,. Robin A & Wibert M. Gesler (2005). Culture/ Place/ health. Routledge, London and New York.
  14. Konicki Di Lorio. Colleen (2005). Measurements in Health Behavior. Methods for Research and Education. Josey – Bass. San Francisco, USA
  15. lai. Poh-Chin, Fun-Mun So, Ka-Wing Chan (2009). Spatial Epidemiological Approaches in Disease Mapping and Analysis. CRC Press. USA
  16. Kawachi. Ichiro, Btuce P. Kennedy, Richard G. Wilkinson (1999) The Society and Population Health, Reader. Income inequality and health. The New Press, New York USA.
  17. milun. Kathryn (2007). Pathology of Modern Space. Routledge, London and New York
  18. liliweri. Hello (2007) Health Communication Basics. Student Library. Yogyakarta.
  19. Pacione Michael. Medical Geography Progress and Prospect. Chrome Helmet; London
  20. Philip, D.R. Contemporary Issues in The Geography of Health Care. Geo Abstract LTD, University of East Anglia, England.
  21. Stimson, Rj. Research Design and Methodological All Problems in The Geography. Flinders University, Adelaide Australia
  22. Sutrisna, B (1999..). Introduction to Epidemiological Methods. Binarupa Aksara, Jakarta.
  23. Slamer Riyadi, AL (199..). Introduction to Environmental Health.. Your creation, Surabaya Indonesia    
  24. Taylor. Shelley E. (2012) Health Psychology. McGraw Hill, Singapore
  25. Tabibzadeh. I, A Rossi-Espagnet, R. Maxwell. Spotlight on The Cities. World Health Organization. Geneva, Switzerland.
  26. Winston, VH & Sons. Applied Medical Geography. Halsted Press New York.

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Code: SCGE603910 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

After taking this course, students are able to identify and analyze the distribution and impact of industrial activities as a symptom of human life and its interaction with nature in creating a spatially productive life in the industrial sector.

Subject :

  1. Industry concept in geographic approach
  2. Factors of production and factors of location
  3. Industry Orientation
  4. The concept of spatial economic theory in industry with LQ, SSA and IS . methods
  5. Industrial Policy
  6. Environmental impact analysis
  7. Industrial Impact Method
  8. Industry distribution pattern

Reference :

  1. Bale, J., 1984. The location of manufacturing industry : an introduction approcah. Hong Kong : Wing King Tong Co. Ltd. 

  2. Berry, BJL, EC Conkling, and DM Ray. 1997. The global economy in transition. New York : Prentice Hall International, Inc

  3. Smith, DM, 1981. Industrial location : an economic geographical analysis. Toronto : John Wiley & Sons

  4. Andrew Leyshon and Nigel T. (1997). Money Space. Geography of Monetary Transformation. Routledge. London and New York

  5. Sukanto, R and Brojdonegoro, ABP. (1920. Environmental Economics. BPFE, Yogyakarta.

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Code: SCGE603911 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

Students are able to develop ideas for appropriate sustainable transportation models according to the characteristics of the region

Subject :

  1. The phenomenon of transportation in urban and non-urban areas
  2. Spatial organization and transportation
  3. Accessibility and mobility
  4. Rise and pull trip
  5. Modes of transportation
  6. Demand and supply movement patterns and characteristics of customer needs
  7. Transport and its impact
  8. The right sustainable transportation model according to the characteristics of the region

Reference :

  1. Boyce, RR (ed). 1980. Geography as Spatial Interaction

  2. Rodrigue, JP; C. Comtois, B. Slack. 2013. The Geography of Transportation Systems. Routledge. New York. 

  3. Taaffe, EJHL Gauthier, ME O'Kelly. 2000. Geography of Transportation. Prentice Hall

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Code: SCGE603913 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

Students are able to conclude and provide an assessment of agricultural activities that occur in a location related to its geographical conditions. Including discussing environmental issues, agricultural policies, as well as the community as actors in agricultural activities and the aspects that influence the occurrence of these patterns on earth.

Subject :

  1. Agricultural Dynamics Concept
  2. Types and methods of farming
  3. Types and levels of agricultural industry growth of agricultural businesses in various scales and their supporting factors
  4. Policies in agricultural development and agricultural conditions in Indonesia with the facts of the government's political support

Reference :

  1. Armbruster Walter J. 2013. US Program Affecting Food and Agricultural Marketing. Springer. New York
  2. Ben Lowe. 2009. Green Revolution: Coming Together to Care for Creation. InterVarsity Press, Downer Grow, Illinois
  3. Food Association Organization [FAO], 2003. World Food Atlas 1999-2001, FAO.
  4. Fritz J. Häni, László Pintér and Hans R. Herren. 2007. Sustainable Agriculture: From Common Principles to Common Practice. Proceedings and outputs of the first Symposium of the International. the International Institute for Sustainable Development. Switzerland.
  5. Grigg David. 1995. An Introduction to Agricultural Geography. Second edition first published 1995.by Routledge. 11 New Fetter Lane, London EC4P 4EE
  6. Guy Robinson 2004. Geographies of Agriculture: Globalisation, Restructuring and Sustainability. Prentice Hall. London
  7. Pidwirny, Michael. 2004. Fundamentals of Physical Geography. Department of Geography, Okanagan University College
  8. Suhardjo. AJ 2008. Rural Geography. Media Ideas. Yogyakarta
  9. Sri Hardiyanti Purwadi.dkk.2015. Geographic Information System Remote Sensing Application. Polymedia Publishing. Jakarta

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Code: SCGE603915 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

After taking this course, students are able to analyze physical (natural) and human resources systematically and spatially for tourism activities, the impact of tourism activities, and tourism planning according to spatial scale.

Subject :

  1. The concept and scope of tourism geography

  2. Tourism spatial system

  3. Tourism economic system

  4. Physical resources for tourism

  5. Landscape elements for tourism:

Reference :

  1. Burton, R. 2000. Travel Geography. Pitman Publishing. USA
  2. Williams, S. 2009. Tourism Geography – A new synthesis. Routledge Taylor & Francis Group. London and New York.

Addition:

  1. Crouch, D. 2001. Leisure/Tourism Geography. Routledge. London.
  2. Gosling, S and C. Michael Hall. 2006.tourism and Global Environmental Change – Ecological, Social, Economic, and Political Interrelationships. Routledge Taylor & Francis Group. London and New York.
  3. Gunn, CA 2002. Tourism Planning: Basics, Concepts, Cases.. Routledge. London.
  4. Darsoprajitno H Soewarno, 2002. Tourism Ecology. Bandung: Space

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Code: SCGE603917 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to assess life resource problems based on geographical work procedures
  2. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective

Purpose :

After taking this course, students are able to combine the latest symptoms of urban development and the concept of a future city in the context of sustainable development.

Subject :

  1. Urbanization now and in the future
  2. Global and local urban issues
  3. Global city concept and features
  4. The megacity phenomenon of developed vs developing countries
  5. Recent urban trends (green city, smart city, digital city, etc.)
  6. Digitization of urban space and emergence micro cities
  7. Urbanism and urban life
  8. Socio-economic problems of global cities
  9. Future city management and sustainable development

Reference :

  1. Hall, T. & H. Barrett. (2012). Urban Geography. Routledge
  2. Pacione, M. (2009). Urban Geography, A Global Perspective. Routledge

Code: SCGE603918 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

After completing this course, students are able to model the behavior of individuals, communities and society in interacting with space in the perspective of physical and non-physical space.

Subject :

  1. Introduction to spatial behavior
  2. The development of geography and the emergence of interest in the study of spatial behavior
  3. The future of spatial behavior studies
  4. Culture and behavior in a spatial perspective
  5. Social psychology
  6. Decision making in the perspective of spatial behavior
  7. The development of the need for Mixed Method
  8. Spatial Behavior: Environment
  9. Spatial Behavior: Transport and Migration 
  10. Spatial Behavior: Economics and Marketing
  11. Spatial Behavior: Law, Politics and Crime

Reference :

  1. Golledge RG and Stimson RJ, 1997. Spatial Behavior: A Geographic Perspective, The Guilford Press, New York

  2. Scharmer, Otto, and Katrin Kaufer, 2013. Leading From The Emerging Future; Applying Theory U to Transforming Business, Society, and Self. Berrett Koehler Publishers, San Francisco

  3. Senge, Peter, 2006. The Fifth Discipline; The Art & Practice of the Learning Organization, Currency Doubleday, New York

  4. Vietor, HK Richard, 2007. How Countries Compete, Strategy, Structure, and Government in the Global Economy, Harvard Business School, Boston

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Code: SCGE603920 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Code: SCGE603921 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

After taking this course, students will be able to design and plan local innovation and creativity activities in urban areas (C6)

Subject :

  1. Introduction to Local Innovation and Creative Courses Innovation and Building Ideas
  2. From Idea to Reality (From Ideas to Reality)
  3. Institutional Innovation
  4. Innovation and Economic Growth, and Innovation in Territorial perspective
  5. Innovation Theory and Strategy (Regional and National Innovation Systems) Innovation Case Study

Reference :

  1. Cooper, Robert G., 2001. Winning at New Product; Accelerating From Ideas to Launch, (3rd edition) Perseus Publishing, Cambridge.
  2. Drucker, Peter F., 1993. Innovation and Entrepreneurship , Harper Business, New York.
  3. Hammel, Laury and Gun Denhart,  Growing Local Values; How to Build Business Partnerships that Strengthen Your Community, The Social Venture Network Series, BK Publisher Inc., San Francisco.
  4. Hesselbein, F. and Rob Johnston (eds.), 2005. On Creativity, Innovation, and Renewal, (translation) PT Elex Media Komputindo, Jakarta.
  5. Kim, W. Chan and Renee Mauborgne, 2013. Blue Ocean Strategy. (translation) Veranda, Jakarta.
  6. Kim, Linsu and Richard RN, 2000. Technology, Learning & Innovation; Experiences of Newly Industrializing Economics, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
  7. Landry, Chaeles, 2005. The Creative City; A Toolkit for Urban Innovators, Earthscan, London.
  8. Lee, Yong S.(ed.), 1997. Technology Transfer and Public Policy. Quorum Books, Westport.
  9. Coordinating Minister of Economy, 2011. Master Plan for Accelerating Indonesia's Economic Growth (MP3EI) 2011-2025.Menko Ekuin. Jakarta.
  10. Ohmae, Kenichi, 2000. The Invisible Continent; Four Strategic Imperatives of the New Economy, Nicholas Brealey Publishing, London.
  11. Sasmojo, Saswinadi, 2004.  Science, Technology & Development, ITB, Bandung.
  12. Scharmer, Otto, and Katrin Kaufer, 2013. Leading From The Emerging Future; Applying Theory U to Transforming Business, Society, and Self. Barrett Koehler Publishers, San Francisco.
  13. Senge, Peter, 2006. The Fifth Discipline; The Art & Practice of the Learning Organization, Currency Doubleday, New York.
  14. Vietor, HK Richard, 2007. How Countries Compete, Strategy, Structure, and Government in the Global Economy, Harvard Business School, Boston.

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Code: SCGE603922 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

After taking the Territorialization course and natural resource contestation, students are expected to be able to analyze the influence of the earth's surface on human life spatially in the tropics and be able to analyze the adaptation patterns of tropical islanders to environmental changes and technological developments.

Subject :

  1. Natural Resources Concept, The Tragedy of the Common
  2. Classification and distribution of natural resources
  3. Carrying capacity & capacity
  4. Valuing the environments
  5. Power relations of Natural resources in the framework of political ecology: Property rights, stakeholder analysis, externalities, & the environmental problems
  6. Recent issues and conflicts over natural resources: Land use change, water security, energy security, spatial justice, conservation and management of natural resources, policies related to natural resources, & SDGs

Reference :

  1. Tietenberg & Lewis 2014, Environmental & Natural Resource Economics
  2. Korf, B. 2011. Resources, violence and the telluric geographies of small wars. Progress in Human Geography 35(6):733-756.
  3. McCarthy, JF 2007. The Demonstration Effect: Natural Resources, Ethnonationalism and the Aceh Conflict. Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography (28) 314-333.
  4. Peluso, NL and Watts, M. (eds.). 2001b. Violent Environments. Cornell University Press, Ithaca.
  5. Pichler, et.al., 2021, The social and ecological costs of reforestation. Territorialization and industrialization of land use accompany forest transitions in Southeast Asia
  6. UNEP 2015, Natural Resources and Conflict
  7. UNEP 2009, From Conflict to Peacebuilding: The Role of Natural Resources and the Environment
  8. Hardin, Tragedy of the Common, https://www.econlib.org/library/Enc/TragedyoftheCommons.html

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Code: SCGE603923 (2 credits)

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Able to interpret human-environment interdependence based on spatial perspective
  2. Able to formulate opinions based on geographical facts and theories

Purpose :

After attending this course, students are able to assess the application of the principles of spatially sustainable development based on the concepts of political ecology

Subject :

  1. The political position of ecology in the study of geography
  2. Ecological politics in global and local contexts
  3. Theories, approaches and scope of political ecology
  4. Sustainable development in the context of ecological politics
  5. Draft social and environmental (in) justice
  6. Environmental commodification and ecological crisis 
  7. Ecological politics in development practice
  8. The ecological politics of the archipelagic country

Reference :

  1. Zimmerer, Karl S. and Bassett, Thomas J. 2003. Political Ecology: An Integrative Approach to Geography and Environment-Development Studies. The Guilford Press: New York.

  2. Robbins P. 2004. Political Ecology: Critical Introductions to Geography. Blackwell Publishing: Oxford University.

  3. Balasubramanian, A. 2013. Ecology and Geography. University of Mysore: India.

  4. Bryant. L. Raymon & Sinead, Bailey. 2000. Third World Political Ecology. Routledge: London.

  5. Forsyth, T. 2003. Critical Political Ecology: The Politics of Environmental Science. Routledge: London.

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Code: SCGE603924 (2 credits)

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